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  You are here: world-mysteries.com » guest writers » isaac ben jacob & sarah fishberg >> the rise



  



      
Isaac ben Jacob
& Sarah Fishberg:
The Rise

Guest Writers


“The Rise” deals with Europe’s secret history, and tells us about secret religious networks that have presided over the creation and growth of the great monastic orders, as well as played a prominent role in the vast majority of the many conflicts Europe has faced throughout its tumultuous history.
This book also speaks of the still little-known “heresy” that is Manichaeism.
Manichaeism rapidly spread from Persia to Europe, where its followers slowly but steadily infiltrated the Catholic Church’s hierarchy, and eventually gained domination over it.
The perspective of the book, starting out with this broad and far-reaching topic, then focuses upon a more specific, local case which is the Rennes-le-Chateau mystery, i.e. the enigmatic story of a country priest whose sudden and inexplicable riches have spawn an entire book industry.
It is precisely this wide-ranging historical approach based upon the history of the great Christian heresies, which enables “The Rise” to bring about a genuine revolution in the understanding of the RLC mystery.
Therefore, this book will bring a goldmine’s worth of valuable information to people interested in the secret history of Europe, and of its religions or heresies past and present (Catharism in particular).
Not only is “The Rise” a first, but it also is a scoop, since it positively demonstrates, using no less than five thousands of document references as pieces of evidence in the process, that the Catholic Church slowly moved away from Christianity over the centuries, only to borrow and integrate most of the principles of Manichaeism into its official doctrine.


"The Rise" - Introduction

In medieval Europe, a new power was rising. A heresy had infiltrated the Catholic hierarchy, beginning a centuries-long campaign to alter the Church's original teachings. This heresy was a penitent movement, based on a Babylonian cult of the dead. The bizarre public spectacles they displayed -- and still do today in the streets of Europe -- include acts of penance and self-mortification, but there are smokescreens to draw attention from the movement's true workings.

The authors led a team of researchers tracking this movement from the Middle-East to Italy, Germany and France. Eventually, they realized that the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau, linked with the extraordinary fortune of one Bérenger Saunière, was another episode in the long and intriguing tale of this heretical movement. “The Rise” reveals that within the world of religion, there have long been secret battles between the Church hierarchy and various movements that have tried to penetrate and take it over, sometimes successfully !

The cover of our new book, “The Rise”, is excerpted from a very interesting large canvas painting by Salvatore Castiglione (Italian, 1617-1656), which it titled: “Tobit Burying the Dead in Babylon” . This painting was commissioned to Salvatore Castiglione by the Duke of Mantua, for whom he was working at the time.
It is meant to illustrate the Book of Tobit, an apocryphal writing of Chaldean origin, the contents of which is discussed in detail in our book. The Book of Tobit basically describes the workings of cult of the dead practiced by the old man Tobit and his son Tobias, in Babylon. Salvatore was the younger brother of the more famous Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, named “Il Grechetto” (1609–1664).

About the Authors

Isaac Ben Jacob & Sarah Fishberg are both French journalists, living in Normandy. They spearhead a team of international researchers, with whom the story of the penitential network and its history in Europe rose to the surface.

Source: the outside back cover of the book


“The Rise”: Excerpts from the book

with consent of the authors

Setting forth the early condemnation of the Penitent Movement by the Church, and the context.

Still, when we say “pious Christian” to describe Ferrer, let us note that he himself was not exempt from accusations of heresy. He was “a penitent flagellant” himself, a man who was half monk and half layman, living with his disciples, and whose mysticism was focused by long periods of mortification. He may have been Christian, but in practice, he was exactly like the Manicheans, flagellating himself in the streets. When the weavers and garderners joined him in the street procession in Perpignan, it was largely because they saw in him one of them.

Pope Clement VI, in his bull “Inter Sollicitudines”, dated 19th November 1350, had already spoken out against this flagellant movement as it apparently distressed the clerics. The penitents seemed to be a “reincarnation” of the Cathars, originating as they did from the Cathar regions in Flanders and Central Italy, where they had not been subject to a crusade, but must have realised that reform was necessary in order to survive. Fifty years later, we find them in the South of France, the former heartland of the Cathar religion, near and in Perpignan, with Ferrer at the helm. Under the direction of Ferrer, large processions were organised, and soon, the streets were full of people dressed in the now infamous “cagoules” (hoods with eye holes), flagellating themselves, sometimes to the brink of death (hence the term mortification)… if not actually into that realm.

The issue of flagellation occurred within a larger framework: a Schism within the Church. The Council of Constance (1414-1418) was organised to end the Papal schism which had resulted from the Avignon Papacy, or as it is sometimes known, the "Babylonian Captivity of the Church". In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1309 to 1377 during which seven popes, all French, resided in the French city of Avignon. In 1378, Gregory XI moved the papal residence back to Rome. But due to a dispute over the election of his successor, a faction of cardinals set up an anti-pope back in Avignon.

Although the Council of Constance dismantled the last vestiges of the Avignon papacy, we cannot treat the episode as a one-liner. For one, we note that the foundation of La Sanch occurred in 1416, in the middle of the Council’s existence. In 1415, at about the same time as the Council was in operation, a popular book on how to die, Ars Moriendi (The Art of Dying), was published. It offered advice on the protocols and procedures of a good death and on how to "die well", according to Christian precepts of the late Middle Ages. It was written within the historical context of the effects of the macabre horrors of the Black Death sixty years earlier and the consequent social upheavals of the 15th century. But we should also note that the Cathars were renowned for a specific methodology of dying, with a rite known as the consolamentum, and that the mortifications of the penitent movement was gaining popularity and fame and thus required an admonition from the Pope.

In theory, the Council of Constance was there to mediate, but in practice, to end the Avignon line. Vincent Ferrer was in the Avignon camp, first supporting Clement VII and then Benedict XIII, or Pedro de Luna, a fellow Catalan, who had to flee Avignon and lived in Perpignan at the time. In 1417, the Council, advised by the theologian Jean Gerson, deposed John XXII and the Avignon Pope Benedict XIII, secured the formal resignation of the Roman Pope Gregory XII (who had abdicated in 1415), and elected Pope Martin V, thereby ending the Schism and recognising the line of Roman popes as the legitimate line.

But before this outcome, the Council had also observed that despite such agreements at the top of the church, the heretics might ruin the Church as an entity, preaching, as they were, for a society that had neither a clergy nor priests. Hence, the Council condemned Vincent Ferrer, a condemnation that was no doubt the result of his religious doctrine and his political alliance. On cue, several “scholars" spoke out against what they called “Maniacal” movements, reusing the terms that previous centuries had used against the Manicheans, thus seeding public antipathy against Ferrer and the heretics.

Again it was Jean Gerson who was one of the severest critics of Vincent Ferrer and La Sanch. He was the great theologian of the University of Paris and scandalised by the sect “which infects the Languedoc”. He wrote a discourse to Ferrer, in which he accused him of practicing “cruel rites” as well as “not respecting God’s Law” and also of keeping bad company – which must have implied Pope Benedict XIII, but may have implied others.

Source: http://andrewgough.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1245

__________________

7 Mgr. Leuilleux, Œuvres Complètes (Introduction, textes et notes par Mgr. Glorieux), Paris, Desclée, vol. II (l’œuvre épistolaire), 1960, pp. 200-202; vol. X (l’œuvre polémique), 1973, pp. 46-51.
8 Bernard Duhourceau, « Guide des Pyrénées Mystérieuses », éditions « Tchou ».

 

Extrait 2 :

One of the best known and verified stories about Saunière and his maid is that they both often went into the cemetery, at night. Saunière had even installed a new iron gate door with lock and a retaining wall around the cemetery, apparently so that no-one could find out what the priest was doing throughout the night.
Tomb (Arles sur tech)At first, Saunière explained his nightly activities as "making room in the cemetery" so that more people could be buried. But this excuse did not last for very long and the villagers soon lodged an official complaint against him. They knew that Saunière - often in the presence of Marie - did something in the cemetery at night, something which involved disturbing the bodies of the dead. When the villagers tolerated it no longer, Saunière seems to have stopped doing whatever it was that he and Marie had been doing. To quote Gérard de Sède [1]: "Rumours circulated about this behaviour: even for the less religious, graves were sacred. In the cemetery, the abbé was no longer welcome because, in 1895, the town council ordered him to leave the dead to sleep in peace."

The « Sainte Tombe » (Sacred Tomb) located in Sainte Marie Abbey, in the village of Arles-sur-Tech, department of Pyrénées-Orientales (Eastern Pyrenees), Southern France. This marble sarcophagus, dating back to the IVth century after Christ, holds the remains of two Manichean saints, Abdon and Sennen. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of this ancient tomb is that water has been miraculously, inexplicably pouring out from it on a regular basis since at least the Xth century, when the abbot Arnulf put the relics of the two saints in it. The "tomb water" has a different composition from natural or mineral water, and it is said to have great curative properties. Berenger Sauniere himself used it to heal a small infant that Julie Fons, his mother, had entrusted to his care. The baby boy was baptized "Abdon" in memory of his miraculous recovery, which Sauniere attributed to St. Abdon. Sauniere raised Abdon Fons as if he were his own son. He even filed a formal request to the Vatican to have this "miracle" officially acknowledged by the Church, most probably in the hope of establishing a pilgrimage site to the Sacred Tomb at Arles-sur-Tech! (Had he succeeded in this attempt, such an attraction would have proved a very lucrative source of income for him.)

Many have interpreted these actions as being part of Saunière's search - or removal of evidence - with regard to his treasure. The testimonies given to the town council, as well as to the police station, during the years 1891 till 1896, make it clear that the villagers complained of the desecration of graves and Saunière's practice of strange rites. When he was forced to explain, he merely stated that "several parishioners die each year; the cemetery became too small to give them a decent grave. I made the ossuary, which you can clearly see, with the remains of the old dead." So Saunière was unable to hide the fact that he was digging up and transporting corpses, but he gave a mundane explanation for it. Penitential Christ (Puente la Reina)René Descadeillas is one of the most distinguished authorities on the enigma and is considered to be a sceptic. Still, even he notes that this episode is "a mystery": "The priest had caused several of his fellow townsmen to complaint to the Prefecture. Saunière locked himself in the cemetery at night and caused strange upheaval. The order was given for Saunière to stop turning the cemetery upside down. But what was he doing there? Why did he damage the graves? It's a mystery."[2]

 
Penitential Christ crucified upon a TAU sign. Here is an example of a heretic representation of the crucifixion, one which is quite specific to the penitent movement of brotherhoods and confraternities. The photograph was taken in Spain, at Puente la Reina.

Descadeillas did not believe the story that Saunière had found a great treasure. Descadeillas was the chief librarian of the Municipal Library of Carcassonne and a leading member of a local historical society [3] and thus intimately aware of the myths, legends and history of the region. But although he did not believe the treasure story that Gérard de Sède and Noël Corbu attributed to Saunière, the above quote makes it clear that he did not think that Saunière's actvities were free of mystery either.

The archives in the possession of Laurent Buchholtzer shed further light on this episode, as they contain the text of several formal complaints against Saunière lodged by the villagers before the town council :

"Rennes-le-Château, March 12, 1895.

Mr. Prefect,

We have the honour to inform you regarding the agreement of Rennes-le-Château's town council, during the meeting which took place on Sunday the 10th of March at 1pm in the townhall.
We, the voters, protest their decision; the said work which they [4] allowed the abbé to carry out, is of no service; and we emphasise, in support of the first complaint, our wish to be free to, and in control of, the care for the graves of our ancestors lying there, and M. l'Abbé had no right, after we had put crosses or crowns, to move, lift or dislodge anything."

A secret subterranean cemetery located in Naples

The picture shows the entrance of a secret subterranean cemetery located in Naples, underneath a church. Such are the places where the penitents celebrate the Cult of the Dead.

 

 

 

"Rennes-le-Château, March 14, 1895.

Mr. Prefect,

We are upset about the work being carried out in the cemetery, above all in the conditions it has been up to now. Crosses have been removed, as well as gravestones, and at the same time this said work is neither for maintenance, nor for anything else.

Christ's dead body

Penitents believe that Christ was never resurrected, that His rise did not occur. However, in their peculiar belief system, Christ's dead body is associated with a mummified corpse, and they believe that worship must be paid to the dead in order to enable them to be reincarnated on this earth. Amongst other things, it accounts for their worship of the Holy Sepulchre, and all the depictions of a dead, bloody Christ lying in a coffin that can be found in Catholic churches across the world.

 

We join our signature: Faure Joseph, town councillor, Clottes Isidore, private guard, witnessed by Messrs. Garouste, Tysseire and Mis, not knowing how to sign."

It is "our wish to be free to, and in control of, the care for the graves of our ancestors lying there."

This first hand evidence paints an even more dramatic picture than the reports of Descadeillas or de Sède. It shows that the entire town is furious about what is happening and that they do not accept the explanations that Saunière is giving them. Furthermore, it makes it clear that Saunière is rearranging and disturbing the dead, leaving the villagers incapable of decorating the graves of their family members as they please. It is equally clear that Saunière's actions are totally at odds with the will of the villagers. And the villagers do not believe Saunière's explanation as to why he is doing it either.

A Cathar graveThe first hand accounts do not mention the presence of Marie during these nocturnal activities, but then they are not expected to. Both de Sède and Descadeillas did include her. We note that Saunière was a tall, powerful man and would not have needed the help of Marie in anything that he did. except, of course, if he did more than move graves.

A Cathar grave, in Spain.

We do not know what rituals Saunière performed on the dead, but could it be that they were very similar to the Consolamentum that was performed by the Cathar priests in medieval times? J.M. Vidal in his book Doctrine et Morale des derniers Ministres Albigeois [5] emphasises that this was administered "to the dying, even to the dead, when they cannot sin anymore." Did Marie perform the role of the "socia", i.e. the assistant, as there was required to be one to help the Cathar priest; these assistants could be male (socius) or female (socia)? [6] Let us finally note that Saunière performed his work at night, as did Tobit. Rummaging in graveyards at nighttime is not immediately recognisable with proper Christian customs.

 

Extrait 3 :

"Penitence, Penitense"

There are other clues which lead us to the conclusion that Saunière knew about the penitent movement - and was if not a member, then at least sympathetic to them. At the base of the altar in his church, he added the following inscription: "JESU MEDELA VULNERUM + SPES UNA POENITENTIUM + PER MAGDALENAE LACRYMAS + PECCATA NOSTRA DILUAS", which means: "Jesus, cure for the injuries + sole hope of the penitents + through the tears of the Magdalene + erase our sins". Above, we see a depiction of Mary Magdalene praying inside a cave, in front of a cross, with a human skull at her feet. The altar piece has become one of the key ingredients in the mystery of Saunière. but few have noted that it may be the inscription underneath that holds the answer.
It is not the only reference to penitence and a "unique hope" that Saunière used in his work. Elsewhere, just outside of his church, there is a statue of the Virgin Mary, sitting on what is said to be a pillar of Visigothic origins. On top of the pillar, we can read "PENITENCE, PENITENSE!" Indeed, Saunière is "screaming it out": Penitence, penitence !

Tau, Pax, PS/SP

The Tau, « Pax » and « P.S / S.P » signs are symbols that are used by penitents as tools in their ceremonies and rituals. Their presence can be tracked down through these symbols, and it is no coincidence that the same symbols also are present in the Rennes-le-Château mystery.

 

 

 

These are key indications that Saunière and penitence were no strangers to one another.  But we do not know whether he was a member of a penitent fraternity, or a member of the Archconfraternity of La Sanch. If - IF - he was, is it possible that he stumbled upon a secret? Was it their secret? Is this perhaps the true origin of his fortune?  If so, what type of secret was it? Was it a secret linked with the Cathars ?

The Holy SepulchreA prime example of the mingling between Christianity and the Babylonian Cult of the Dead created by the penitent confraternities: a depiction of a dead Christ, lying in a glass-windowed coffin. Therefore, the object of worship here is not really the person of Jesus-Christ and His life, but his dead body, his tomb (the Holy Sepulchre), and by extension, death itself, and any corpse of any origin.

 

In whatever scenario we follow, we know what the next step of the story is: after visiting Saunière in 1906, his bishop, Mgr. de Beauséjour, ordered him to open up his accounts. De Beauséjour was trying to follow the money, to see where it was coming from. And for Saunière, it was therefore vital to make sure that de Beauséjour would never lay his hands on his true accounts, for that would mean that the bishop could consequently piece everything together - which is actually what we are doing here. And we know that in his efforts to block this investigation, Saunière was helped by the penitent organisations. as always. Still, this does not give us the answer as to what was truly going on. In our search for answers, let us delve deeper into La Sanch and their customs.

The cloister of the Sainte Marie Abbey in the village of Arles-sur-TechBird's eye view of the cloister of the Sainte Marie Abbey in the village of Arles-sur-Tech, where the "Sacred Tomb" of the Manichean princes Abdon and Sennen is located (see above).

 

 

 

 

Bernard Duhourceau [7] states that La Sanch practises particular if not peculiar rituals. In Perpignan, those that were condemned to die were placed inside the church of St. James, where they passed the night before their execution in the company of these penitents. La Sanch was there to comfort those who were on death row, preparing them for their demise. On the morning of the execution, the penitents dressed themselves in a "red cape" and hid their faces with the customary "cagoule" (a hood, originally made out of hemp cloth, and pierced with two holes for the eyes). They then accompanied the condemned person to his execution, while asking money from the crowds. It appears that this money was used to pay for a tomb for the condemned soul, as well as to fill the coffers of the fraternity. That money was used for other services, which in essence involved organising the burials of people who would otherwise not be buried.

Is there something in these practices that Saunière could have used - or abused - to make money, in one form or another? From the sort of relationships that the priest had with hospitals and monasteries, could it be that Saunière recouped the money to perform such burial rites? Religious hospitals, at that time, attracted the very ill and the dying. Saunière was in regular contact with such institutions, as we can see from his accounts. And whenever he wrote to one, he seemed to get money in return. Could it be that Saunière assured those that were dying a death in conformity with their desires? And did he receive fees for burial rites from them ?

A Tau symbol combined with the A Tau symbol combined with the "IHS" monogram, engraved on a stone in the outer wall of the church of the village of Prats-de-Mollo, near Arles-sur-Tech. One can notice that the stone bearing the Tau, on account of its shape, was originally on the top of a door arch. This particular symbol was the emblem of the "La Sanch" penitent confraternity. The stone also bears a date (1652), which makes it probable that it was located at the main entrance of the church. This carved stone may well be a memorial of a restoration of the church of Prats-de-Mollo financed by "La Sanch" (the local penitent brotherhood) during the XVIIth century.

Let us summarise what we are implying: certain people had set money aside for their funerals. Some of these people entrusted this to a religious hospital : they would take care of the ill person, until he died, and then bury him. La Sanch had originally practiced this service for those that were condemned to death: they stayed with the condemned in the period before their death, accompanied them to their execution, at which time they were "paid" by the watching crowds. They then used the money to bury the corpse afterwards. Did Saunière write to these various institutions, asking whether anyone in their hospitals had requested a special type of preparation for their death? If so, did he inform the hospital that he would take care of these "details", which may have involved guidance for the deceased, as well as taking care of the burial ? Or saying masses after a person's death ? If he did, then the hospitals would indeed transfer money to Saunière, for it was he, and no longer the hospital, that was in charge of the funds that had been set aside by the ill or dying for this service.

Let us add that this type of "service" was also practiced by the Cathars. They had priests - known as "perfects" - who travelled the breadth and width of the country, performing this function. One of their main tasks was to perform a rite for the dying, the consolamentum, which was the immediate preparation for death - and thus similar to the "services" La Sanch offered.

© Isaac ben Jacob, August 4, 2008


Bibliography and Refrences

[1] Gérard de Sède, « Le Trésor Maudit de Rennes-le-Château », "J'ai Lu" (1972). For the English translation, refer to "The Accursed Treasure of Rennes-le-Chateau", DEK Publishing, 2001, translated by Bill Kersey.

[2] René Descadeillas, « Notice sur Rennes-le-Château et l'abbé Saunière » (Notice on Rennes-le-Château and abbé Saunière) (1962). This famous writing was subjected to several modifications before being finally included in « Mythologie du trésor de Rennes », the full reference of which follows.

René Descadeillas, « Mythologie du Trésor de Rennes: Histoire Véritable de l'abbé Saunière, Curé de Rennes-le-Château » ("Mythology of the Treasure of Rennes-le-Château : the Real Story of Abbé Saunière, Priest of Rennes-le-Château"), in « Mémoires de la Société des Arts et des Sciences de Carcassonne » (Research Bulletin of the Arts and Science Society of Carcassonne), 1971-1972 years, 4 th series, volume VII, 2 nd part; published in 1974.

[3] Elected a member of the Société des Etudes Scientifiques de l'Aude (Society of Scientific Studies of the Aude region) when he was 29, René Descadeillas (1909-1986) became chief librarian of the Municipal Library of Carcassonne in 1950, and then in 1964, chairman of the Musée des Beaux-Arts (Museum of the Arts) of Carcassonne. Meanwhile, in 1957, this erudite scholar had seen his talent recognised through his promotion as President-elect of the Société des Etudes Scientifiques de l'Aude.

[4] "They" refers to the town council of Rennes-le-Château.

[5] Vidal, Jean-Marie, « Doctrine et morale des derniers ministres albigeois » ("Doctrine and Morality of the last Albigenses Ministers"), in Revue des Questions Historiques (Magazine of Historical Questions), LXXXV (1909), pp. 357-409, LXXVI (1910), pp. 5-48. Duplicated in fac-sim: Impr. C. Lacour, RediViva, Nîmes, 2002.

[6] It is certainly a possibility, given that one the main characteristics of Cathar couples was that the perfects were not allowed to marry, let alone to have sexual relationships, with their sociae (plural of socia).

[7] Bernard Duhourceau, « Guide des Pyrénées Mystérieuses » ("A Guide to the Mysterious Pyrenees"), Tchou editions. Refer to chapter 7 "Mystères et processions" (Mysteries and Processions), part 3 "Le vêtement d'infamie" ("The garment of infamy"), paragraphs 1 to 5.

 

[1] Gérard de Sède, « Le Trésor Maudit de Rennes-le-Château », "J'ai Lu" (1972). For the English translation, refer to “The Accursed Treasure of Rennes-le-Chateau”, DEK Publishing, 2001, translated by Bill Kersey.

[2] René Descadeillas, « Notice sur Rennes-le-Château et l'abbé Saunière » (Notice on Rennes-le-Château and abbé Saunière) (1962). This famous writing was subjected to several modifications before being finally included in « Mythologie du trésor de Rennes », the full reference of which follows.

René Descadeillas, « Mythologie du Trésor de Rennes: Histoire Véritable de l'abbé Saunière, Curé de Rennes-le-Château » (“Mythology of the Treasure of Rennes-le-Château : the Real Story of Abbé Saunière, Priest of Rennes-le-Château”), in « Mémoires de la Société des Arts et des Sciences de Carcassonne » (Research Bulletin of the Arts and Science Society of Carcassonne), 1971-1972 years, 4 th series, volume VII, 2 nd part; published in 1974.

[3] Elected a member of the Société des Etudes Scientifiques de l'Aude (Society of Scientific Studies of the Aude region) when he was 29, René Descadeillas (1909-1986) became chief librarian of the Municipal Library of Carcassonne in 1950, and then in 1964, chairman of the Musée des Beaux-Arts (Museum of the Arts) of Carcassonne. Meanwhile, in 1957, this erudite scholar had seen his talent recognised through his promotion as President-elect of the Société des Etudes Scientifiques de l'Aude.

[4] “They” refers to the town council of Rennes-le-Château.

[5] Vidal, Jean-Marie, « Doctrine et morale des derniers ministres albigeois » (“Doctrine and Morality of the last Albigenses Ministers”), in Revue des Questions Historiques (Magazine of Historical Questions), LXXXV (1909), pp. 357-409, LXXVI (1910), pp. 5-48. Duplicated in fac-sim: Impr. C. Lacour, RediViva, Nîmes, 2002.

[6] It is certainly a possibility, given that one the main characteristics of Cathar couples was that the perfects were not allowed to marry, let alone to have sexual relationships, with their sociae (plural of socia).

[7] Bernard Duhourceau, « Guide des Pyrénées Mystérieuses » (“A Guide to the Mysterious Pyrenees”), Tchou editions. Refer to chapter 7 “Mystères et processions” (Mysteries and Processions), part 3 “Le vêtement d'infamie” (“The garment of infamy”), paragraphs 1 to 5.
 


Books

 

The Rise: Saunières Magical Workings and the Penitential Movement in Europe (Paperback) 
by Isaac ben Jacob & Sarah Fishberg

The book is scheduled to be released by Adventures Unlimited Press on October 8th, 2008. It will then be available in stores in the USA.

The description written on the outside back cover.

“In medieval Europe, a new power was rising. A heresy had infiltrated the Catholic hierarchy, beginning a centuries-long campaign to alter the Church’s original teachings.
This heresy was a penitent movement, based on a Babylonian cult of the dead.
The bizarre public spectacles they displayed -- and still do today in the streets of Europe -- include acts of penance and self-mortification, but there are smokescreens to draw attention from the movement’s true workings.
The authors led a team of researchers tracking this movement from the Middle-East to Italy, Germany and France. Eventually, they realized that the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau, linked with the extraordinary fortune of one Berenger Sauniere, was another episode in the long and intriguing tale of this heretical movement.
“The Rise” reveals that within the world of religion, there have long been secret battles between the Church hierarchy and various movements that have tried to penetrate and take it over -- sometimes successfully!”

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Within medieval Europe, a new power was rising. A heresy had infiltrated the hierarchy of the Catholic Church almost to the very top, and begun what would become a centuries-long campaign of altering the Church’s original teachings to make them conform to its own.

About the Author

Isaac ben Jacob & Sarah Fishberg are both French journalists, living in Normandy. They spearhead a team of international researchers, with whom the story of the penitential network and its history in Europe rose to the surface.
 

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages

  • Publisher: Adventures Unlimited Press (September 12, 2008)

  • Language: English

  • ISBN-10: 1931882878

  • ISBN-13: 978-1931882873


 

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